The End of an Era at Drayton Hall

Dr. George W. McDaniel

Dr. George W. McDaniel

George McDaniel, the driving force behind the Drayton Hall Preservation Trust for more than 25 years, has announced he’ll be stepping down at the end of the month. It’s bittersweet news for Drayton Hall staff and supporters, all of whom will miss George’s leadership but pleased he’ll have the opportunity to spend more time with family, research and writing. Here’s more from the official announcement:

Drayton Hall Preservation Trust (DHPT), a privately funded nonprofit organization responsible for the operation and administration of Drayton Hall, A National Trust Historic Site, today announced that President and Executive Director George W. McDaniel, Ph.D. would be stepping down on June 30.

“Drayton Hall has been my passion and purpose for more than 25 years,” said McDaniel, “and I can’t imagine a better or more fulfilling vocation. But the time has come to turn over leadership responsibilities so I can focus on family, research, writing and other projects. I thank the Drayton family, whose vision made all of this possible, and the Drayton Hall Preservation Trust board of trustees, our outstanding staff and the thousands of Friends and visitors who have supported us during my tenure.”

Under McDaniel’s leadership, Drayton Hall earned international acclaim for its preservation policies and projects and for expanding the research and interpretation of the site to tell a more complete story. Such programs have won awards at the local, state, and national levels.

“With George at the helm, Drayton Hall became a nationally recognized leader in historic preservation,” said DHPT board chair Steve Gates. “He expanded its educational programming, grew its staff and resources and engineered its co-stewardship model with the National Trust. His contributions over the past 26 years have been vital to Drayton Hall and its important mission.”

McDaniel spearheaded conservation of the Ashley River region as well as outreach to both Drayton and African American family descendants, efforts that now serve as models for other historic sites across the nation. He enhanced both the quantity and stewardship of archival, archaeological and museum collections and was instrumental in securing a firm financial future for DHPT by producing either a balanced budget or a surplus every year during his tenure.

“For more than a quarter century, George has been the face of Drayton Hall, and he has represented the very best in historic site leadership,” said Stephanie K. Meeks, president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “He has strengthened Drayton Hall’s connections to the community, created a transformative experience for visitors, and led the exemplary preservation of the site and the surrounding landscape of the Ashley River corridor. George is widely recognized for his work in interpreting African American history at Drayton Hall. His innovative approaches have become models for engagement and interpretation that have influenced the way this important work is done across the National Trust’s portfolio of sites and many other properties around the country.  George’s legacy and impact will be felt for years to come.”

Joseph P. Riley, Jr., Mayor of the City of Charleston, added: “George McDaniel has given extraordinary and invaluable service to Drayton Hall, to the City of Charleston, and to the historic preservation movement. He has served as a local and national spokesperson for historic preservation, history education, and historic sites, and leaves a permanent and positive mark on our region and on the preservation of our historic and architectural treasures nationwide.”

In July, McDaniel will transition to President Emeritus, a consultative position that will advise DHPT board and staff. McDaniel will also take a well-deserved (and long deferred) sabbatical commencing July 1 through September 30. Vice President and Deputy Director Carter C. Hudgins, Ph.D. will serve as interim executive director until a permanent selection is made.  A search committee, led by Gates, has already begun its research and evaluation process to find new leadership.

“I think that George has done an absolutely wonderful job as executive director since he’s been at Drayton Hall,” said Charles Henry “Charlie” Drayton, III, 7th-generation descendant of the Drayton family. “I hope that he enjoys his well-deserved sabbatical. He has built remarkable bridges of friendship, for my family continues to feel so much a part of Drayton Hall.” Catherine Braxton, a descendant of the African American Bowens family, and a member of the DHPT board, agreed and said, “George is a bridge builder. He sees our common humanity.”


A Tribute to Miss Sally

At the close of Women’s History Month, we would like to pay tribute to Sally Reahard, an important benefactress of Drayton Hall. Miss Sally, as she preferred to be called, passed away a decade ago, but her love and support for Drayton Hall can still be seen on the site today. The following tribute is written by Drayton Hall Executive Director George W. McDaniel, who knew and admired Miss Sally and worked with her closely.

By George W. McDaniel, Executive Director

How to characterize Miss Sally? She was her own person, to be sure. She was an original, sui generis. I think most would agree that she was astute and lively. She cut to the chase, and always presented herself well. She didn’t suffer fools or idle chit-chat. She loved to talk, but it was about things of substance, whether history, preservation, conservation, or about forks in the road and which one to take.

A young Miss Sally conveying her love for the outdoors and her joie de vivre spirit.

A young Miss Sally conveying her love for the outdoors and her joie de vivre attitude.

Miss Sally grew up in Indianapolis and went to Sweet Briar College in Virginia. In the small world that this is, she was two years behind my mother, who’d grown up in Atlanta. She remembered Mother well and sent me pictures from the Sweet Briar annual of Mother and also of herself and of my mother’s friends who’d gone to Sweet Briar. Some were classmates of Miss Sally, one, in fact, being my next door neighbor growing up in Atlanta and two others, my “aunts” by affection, one in Atlanta, the other in Augusta, Ga.

The pictures capture Miss Sally’s personality. I wish you could have known her. When I visited her, I encouraged her to visit Charleston since she had so many friends here and had done so much for the city and its museums, historic sites, and conservation organizations, but she refused. She had a number of friends here from her visits in the 1930s and had made new ones, thanks to the fact that she was a wonderful and frequent letter writer and telephone caller. She corresponded with many Charlestonians, subscribed to The Post and Courier, and even wallpapered one of her rooms with scenes from Charleston. She talked to different people and got different points of view on topics related to Drayton Hall. As a result, you had better be well grounded when you talked to her. She really liked Chris and Booie Chappell, who live here on the property, and they were constant correspondents. She also thought highly of Bob Barker and George Neil, the assistant director when I arrived, and my predecessor Letisha Galbraith. She loved our preservation mission, especially in regard to the main house, as well as our efforts to conserve the Ashley River.

Miss Sally

Her devoted and skillful attorney, Gene Wilkins, gave her excellent advice, and together they crafted a strategy for philanthropy. They thought things through, and just as she sought to invest her financial assets wisely to reap a good return, so too she sought to invest her philanthropy wisely. Gene was her right hand man, her candid and thoughtful sounding board, who was not afraid to speak his mind, which she appreciated. During her lifetime, she gave away millions of dollars to non-profits, small and large, especially in Indiana, Michigan, and South Carolina, to organizations whose work she believed in. Upon her death, she left an estate totaling c. $180 million, and she gave it all away.

As you walk around Drayton Hall, you can see things today that are a product, as a whole or in part, of her and Gene’s strategy of philanthropy—things one might take for granted. They include, but are not limited to the following:

• Drayton Hall itself (she gave the leadership private gift)
• water from North Charleston supplying our fire hydrants, the site having had no fire hydrants in the event of fire
• the replacement terne metal roof on the main house, which saved Drayton Hall during Hurricane Hugo
• stabilization of the historical paint and plaster in the main house
• the current administration building
• the Miss Sally Cottage, where the Chappells live
• the preservation department building, tractor/equipment shed, and related site work
• two sets of rip rap on the Ashley River: one at the end of the allée and the other being longer in length and upstream
• the land across the river
• the re-engineered road and parking lot with its sand/shell/gravel mixture (not just sand and gravel, as earlier, which had consistently wash boarded and rutted deeply)
• annual donations each year of c. $50-60K for general operating support
• an endowment bequest of $16M

Miss Sally and George McDaniel

As you can see, all of these things were essential. No frou-frou. When I gave a eulogy at her funeral, I talked about these essential things, and in the interests of time, chose to accent the rip rap, the pile of rocks, seemingly non-descript, but absolutely essential to the preservation of the mid-18th century garden house, one of the oldest sites of a garden house in the South, if not the nation. Each year we’d been losing about 1 foot of the soft riverbank due to erosion caused by wakes from speed boats. We’d won support from the US Corps of Engineers for the installation of rip rap, but had to have a 25% match for the total cost of $280,000. George Neil, assistant director at the time, and I presented the case, and Miss Sally stepped up and provided $70,000 for the match. What a difference she made! To get a sense of just how close the threat was to the garden house, walk out to the live oak behind it. You would have been standing above the river, for the root ball was barely supported by the earth beneath it, so deeply undercut had the riverbank become. Thanks to Miss Sally, that site, so important to garden design, social history, and horticulture, has now been preserved and exemplifies what she has done for us today and for future generations.

That’s the kind of person she was—she wanted action that made a difference to the good. So next time you get a chance, please take a walk to the garden house and out to the live oak, look down and around at the entirety of this remarkable site, and say a word of thanks to Miss Sally.