Finding Answers at Drayton Hall Through Dendrochronology

Small core samples from timbers like these in Drayton Hall’s attic were analyzed to help determine the age of the house, which is a bit younger than previously thought.

Small core samples from Drayton Hall’s attic were analyzed to help determine the age of the house. Photo courtesy of The Post & Courier.

A recent article in The Post & Courier shows how dendrochronology, or tree-ring dating, gives insight into how long it took to build Drayton Hall. Michael Worthington of Oxford Tree-Ring Laboratory removed core samples from the main house’s attic and carefully studied the width of the series of rings, matching them to 18th-century weather records. Worthington’s findings show us that it would have taken approximately a decade for the main house to be completed. 

Click here to read the article. 

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